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Beau Wright
Beau Wright

Dod (15) Mp4


The M4/M4A1 5.56mm Carbine is a lightweight, gas operated, air cooled, magazine fed, selective rate, shoulder fired weapon with a collapsible stock. It is now the standard issue firearm for most units in the U.S. military.




Dod (15) mp4


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Equipped with a shorter barrel, collapsible stock and detachable carrying handle (with a built-in accessory rail) it provides soldiers operating in close quarters with improved handling and the capability to rapidly and accurately engage targets at extended range, day or night.


A shortened variant of the M16A2 rifle, the M4 carbine provides the individual soldier operating in close quarters the capability to engage targets at extended range with accurate, lethal fire. The M4-series Carbine achieves over 80% commonality with the M16A2 Rifle and replaces all M3 .45 caliber submachine guns, and selected M9 pistols and M16 rifles.


There are several benefits to upgrading M4s to M4A1s. Compared to the M4 , the M4A1 has full auto capability, a consistent trigger pull, and a slightly heavier barrel. The heavier barrel is more durable and has greater capacity to maintain accuracy and zero while withstanding the heat produced by high volumes of fire. New and upgraded M4A1s will also receive ambidextrous fire control.


Project Manager Soldier Weapons (PM SW) initiated Phase I by modifying its contract for the production of M4s to the M4A1. PM SW took delivery of 9,582 new M4A1s to complete this action. In support, TACOM Life Cycle Management Command will have fielded approximately 6,000 M4A1 Carbines to the 101st Airborne Division by September and plans to field an additional 3,000 M4A1s to another unit within the next several months.


PM SW also held a competition for the manufacture of 24,000 additional M4A1 Carbines. The Army awarded a contract in April to Remington Arms Co. The award came under protest and the Army is currently developing several courses of action to comply with the Government Accountability Office ruling and concerns regarding the competition. Once the contract dispute is resolved, other services will be able to place M4A1 and M4 orders against the contract as well.


The main thrust of Phase I is to upgrade existing M4s to the M4A1 configuration. The Army authorized the conversion of all M4s to the M4A1 standard with the upgrade currently budgeted for 300,000 M4s. The Army will complete the upgrades through the purchase of components that support modification work orders (MWO) that will be applied by Small Arms Readiness and Evaluation Teams (SARET).


The conclusion of the bolt competition, however, does not impact the search for a better forward rail assembly. PM SW completed bid sample testing for a forward rail assembly competition in early August. The Army may award contracts to up to three finalists in early 2013 with the selection of a final winner in early 2014. If the Army determines that the winning rail system should be procured, delivery of new rails is anticipated in the summer of 2014.


On the third Wednesday of each month, the PTSD Consultation Program hosts a webinar on a topic relevant to treating PTSD. We select topics based on questions providers are bringing to the PTSD Consultation Program and invite an expert in that area to present the lecture. The target audience includes mental health professionals or other health professionals interested in topics related to treating Veterans with PTSD.


PLEASE NOTE: This list of topics is subject to change. We will continue to re-evaluate on a regular basis so that we can bring you relevant lectures in a timely way. Please subscribe (above) to our mailing list to receive the registration links when the following topics are scheduled. Lectures are always on the third Wednesday of the month at 2 p.m. ET.


April 21, 2021 The Elephant in the Room: Treating PTSD When Clinicians Have Negative Reactions to Patients' Sociocultural Views Abigail Angkaw, PhD and Brittany Hall-Clark, PhDAudio Recording (MP4)


Welcome to Navy Region Naval District Washington. "The Quarterdeck of the Navy." With the nation's capital at its heart, Naval District Washington encompasses more than 4,000 square miles, including the District of Columbia; the Maryland counties of Anne Arundel, Calvert, Charles, Frederick, Montgomery, Prince George's, and St. Mary's, and northern Virginia counties of Loudoun, Fauquier, Fairfax, Prince William, Stafford King George, Westmoreland, Arlington and the cities within their outer boundaries.


VisionIn 2027, Naval District Washington leads the shore enterprise as a region of excellence, continually improving the infrastructure and services we deliver to the Fleet, Fighter and Family.


Naval Support Activity (NSA) Annapolis, in coordination with the Maryland Department of the Environment, is implementing measures to control invasive plant species at Greenbury Point in Annapolis, Md.


Naval Support Activity Annapolis (NSAA), local law enforcement, and local emergency medical centers conducted a security response drill at Naval Health Center Annapolis, as part of the Citadel Shield/Solid Curtain (CS/SC) 2023 exercise Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2023.


The M4 carbine (officially Carbine, Caliber 5.56 mm, M4) is a 5.5645mm NATO, gas-operated,[b] magazine-fed carbine developed in the United States during the 1980s. It is a shortened version of the M16A2 assault rifle.


The M4 is extensively used by the United States Armed Forces, with decisions to largely replace the M16 rifle in United States Army (starting 2010) and United States Marine Corps (USMC) (starting 2016) combat units as the primary infantry weapon[9][10] and service rifle. The M4 has been adopted by over 60 countries worldwide,[11] and has been described as "one of the defining firearms of the 21st century".[12]


Since its adoption in 1994,[11] the M4 has undergone over 90 modifications to improve the weapon's ergonomics and modularity, including: the M4A1, which strengthened the barrel and removed the burst-fire option; the SOPMOD, an accessory kit containing optical attachments; and the underbarrel M203 grenade launcher.


Following the adoption of the M16 rifle, carbine variants were also adopted for close quarters operations,[14] the first of which was the CAR-15 family of weapons, which was used in the Vietnam War.[15] However, these rifles had design issues, as the barrel length was halved to 10 inches (25 cm), which upset the ballistics, reducing its range and accuracy and leading to considerable muzzle flash and blast,[16] meaning that a large flash suppressor had to be fitted.[17]


In 1982, the U.S. Government requested Colt to make a carbine version of the M16A2. At the time, the Colt M16A2 was the Colt 645, also known as the M16A1E1. Later that year, the U.S. Army Armament Munitions Chemical Command helped Colt develop a new variant of the XM177E2, and the U.S. Army redesignated the XM177E2 to the XM4 Carbine, giving the name as the successor to the M3 carbine. The carbine used the same upper and lower receiver as the M16A1,[18] and fires the M855 cartridge along with the older M193 cartridges. In 1983, the 9th Infantry Division requested a Quick Reaction Program (QRP) for a 5.56mm carbine to replace the M1 carbine and M3 submachine gun in service.[19][16] The XM4 was tested by the Army's Armament Research and Development Center (ARDC) in June 1983. Later, the gun was updated with improved furniture, and a barrel with rifling of 1 turn in 7 inches (180 mm). The ARDC recommended additional commonality with the M16A2 rifle, as well as lengthening the barrel to 14.5 inches (370 mm).[18] In January 1984, the U.S. Army revised the QRP, and a month later, it formally approved development of the new carbine.[18]


In June 1985, the Picatinny Arsenal was given a contract to produce 40 prototypes of the XM4.[18] Initially a joint program between the Army and Marines, in 1986 the Army withdrew their funding. The XM4 was finished in 1987, and the Marines adopted 892 for that fiscal year, with the designation "carbine, 5.56mm, M4".[18] Owing to experience from the 1991 Gulf War, the Army gave Colt its first production contracts for M4 carbines in May and July 1993, and M4A1 carbines for SOCOM operators in February 1994.[20]


Interest in the M4 carbine was accelerated after the Battle of Mogadishu (1993), in which Rangers complained that their M16 rifles were "unwieldy", whereas members of Delta Force in the same battle, equipped with the CAR-15, had no such complaints.[21] The M4 carbine first saw action in the hands of U.S. troops deployed to Kosovo in 1999 in support of the NATO-led Kosovo Force.[22] It would subsequently be used heavily by U.S. forces during the war on terror, including in Operation Enduring Freedom and the Iraq War.[22] In the Army, the M4 had largely replaced M16A2s as the primary weapon of forward deployed personnel by 2005.[23] The M4 carbine also replaced most submachine guns and selected handguns in U.S. military service,[23] as it fires more effective rifle ammunition that offers superior stopping power and is better able to penetrate modern body armor.[22]


In 2007, the USMC ordered its officers (up to the rank of lieutenant colonel) and staff non-commissioned officers to carry the M4 carbine instead of the M9 handgun.[24] This is in keeping with the Marine Corps doctrine, "Every Marine a rifleman." The Marine Corps, however, chose the full-sized M16A4 over the M4 as its standard infantry rifle. United States Navy corpsmen E5 and below are also issued M4s instead of the M9.[25] While ordinary riflemen in the Marine Corps were armed with M16A4s, M4s were fielded by troops in positions where a full-length rifle would be too bulky, including vehicle operators, fireteam and squad leaders. As of 2013, the U.S. Marine Corps had 80,000 M4 carbines in their inventory.[26][27]


By July 2015, major Marine Corps commands were endorsing switching to the M4 over the M16A4 as the standard infantry rifle, just as the Army had done. This is because of the carbine's lighter weight, compact length, and ability to address modern combat situations that happen mostly within close quarters; if a squad needs to engage at longer ranges, the M27 Infantry Automatic Rifle can be used as a designated marksman rifle. Approval of the change would move the M16 to support personnel, while armories already had the 17,000 M4s in the inventory needed to outfit all infantrymen who needed one.[28] In October 2015, Commandant Robert Neller formally approved of making the M4 carbine the primary weapon for all infantry battalions, security forces, and supporting schools in the USMC. The switch was to be completed by September 2016.[29] In December 2017, the Marine Corps revealed a decision to equip every Marine in an infantry squad with the M27, replacing the M4 in that part of the service.[30] MARSOC will retain the M4, as its shorter barrel is more suited to how they operate in confined spaces.[31] 041b061a72


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