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Aslan Korolev
Aslan Korolev

Leadership In Action: Insights And Observations On Being A Coach Download ~UPD~



The second approach involved in leadership interventions, executive coaching, is an increasingly popular approach to help executives develop leadership skills or behaviors and improve their performance and, therefore, the performance of the organization as a whole (Feldman and Lankau, 2005; Gray, 2006). The number of organizations using executive coaching to develop leaders increases every year because it is considered one of the dominant methodologies for developing effective leaders (Grant, 2013). An effective way to support leadership development in organizations is the strengths-based leadership coaching approach (MacKie, 2014). This approach is based on positive psychology discipline, which focuses on developing positive qualities, rather than dealing with negative aspects such as weaknesses and pathologies (Seligman and Csikszentmihalyi, 2014). Strengths-based coaching is based on the identification, development, and use of personal strengths in order to foster positive outcomes such as goal attainment, optimal functioning, fulfillment, and well-being (Linley et al., 2010b). Specifically in leadership development, this approach provides a structure that includes strength awareness and balance, pairing strengths with leadership skills, and aligning them with personal or organizational goals (MacKie, 2014).




Leadership in Action: Insights and Observations on Being a Coach download


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Observations and feedback from peers and mentors were viewed more positively than observations and feedback from administrators. Ninety percent of teachers reported receiving classroom observations and feedback from school administrators as part of their school's evaluation system, while only 10 percent reported receiving feedback from colleagues or peers and 14 percent from coaches or mentors. Yet a smaller percentage of teachers who indicated being observed or given feedback by an administrator reported that the evaluation systems improved their instructional practices when compared with those who reported being observed or given feedback by a peer or colleague or a mentor or coach.


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